Choosing An Aircraft For Your Journey

Finding the right aircraft can be an intimidating process if you've never chartered before. The cost of your booking will generally be a function of its type (jet vs propeller), size (degree of comfort), passenger capacity and performance (how fast it travels). This is where we come in to help demystify the process and select the right aircraft for your trip.

We will ask you to answer some questions about your travel preferences in order to deliver the best service:

  • How many people are in your group? What are their needs in terms of seating, mobility, catering, and space for baggage?

  • What is most important to you? Speed, amenities, cabin noise level, a smoother ride on aircraft that fly at a higher altitude vs a lower one?

  • How do you envision your time on-board your charter - working on a laptop, having a restful break or spending quality time with your group?

  • Do you mind a refueling stop on a small plane, or would you rather enjoy a nonstop flight?
     

Explore Private Aircraft Types:

 
 

Aviation Terminology Explained

Key words and phrases

  • Passengers (typical): The number of people that can generally be seated on the aircraft. Sometimes, aircraft of the same type will seat more or less passengers depending on the configuration. We will be able to confirm this information as we source aircraft options for your trip.

  • Cabin Dimensions: The length, width and height of the passenger cabin are provided to give you an idea of how much living space you have and whether or not you can stand fully upright. Each aircraft type is different. Pistons generally have the smallest cabin but are intended for short flights, while Heavy Jets and Airliners, with their ability to fly farther, will have the largest.

  • Baggage total: The total baggage capacity of the aircraft as measured in cubic feet. There could be multiple compartments on the aircraft, including some inside the cabin that are accessible during flight. Please note that private jets do not have overhead stowage compartments typical on commercial aircraft. There is commonly an empty seat or space nearby to lay belongings on, and your crew can assist you with stowing any items prior to flight.

  • Average Cruising Speed: The average speed at which the aircraft typically travels through the air, as measured in Knots True Airspace (KTAS). To convert, 1 knot = 1.852 kilometres per hour, or 1.15 miles per hour.

  • Max Cruising Altitude: The maximum cruising altitude of the aircraft measured in feet. You may or may not get to this altitude during your flight - the decision is up the crew, who factor in the aircraft operating characteristics unique to your flight, weather, air traffic control and other factors.

  • Full Passenger Range: A measure of how far the aircraft can travel with its typical full passenger load, measured in nautical miles (NM). To convert, 1 nautical mile = 1.852 kilometres, or 1.15 miles. The aircraft range figure provided in this section may not always be 100% accurate, and will vary based on operating considerations that are unique to each flight.

  • Lavatory: The availability of a lavatory on-board the aircraft is noted. "Limited" usually refers to a simple toilet with partial privacy (usually a curtain) on smaller aircraft that otherwise might not have one at all due to space constraints. Standard provisions on most private jets are fully enclosed and have a vanity and other amenities.

  • Galley: The availability of facilities designated to store, cool and/or heat food and beverages for consumption on-board. "Limited" generally refers to a small stowage area or compartment that may not be refrigerated. This is typical of smaller aircraft. A full galley on larger private jets commonly consists of several storage compartments, an oven (microwave or convection), fridge, and stock of glassware and flatware.